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Abstract ISS.

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John9929
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« on: July 22, 2008, 02:21:35 pm »

This was the 0039BST pass of the ISS on July 21st. It's a wide shot (24mm) of the bottom half of the
Summer Triangle with Delphinus at centre and Altair at right. The Coathanger is at top right. Some fast
moving clouds illuminated by the moon made this into an abstract image. 30" at f4 ISO800. This scaled
down version is a bit noisy compared to the origional.
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Roman White
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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2008, 02:26:48 pm »

Yes, it's a bit noisy but looks very nice. It looks like the rays not like the clouds
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Paul
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2008, 02:29:21 pm »

Very atmospheric John - looks like it was pretty close to a direct hit on Altair just a few seconds earlier!
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2008, 02:36:16 pm »

That's a cracker!. Wonderful effect with the fast moving clouds. I like the way the trail 'switches off' due to a dense section of cloud. The ISS is nicely placed between Altair and Job's Coffin.  Fancy doing a deeper exposure of Aquila John for signs of 6P/d'Arrest?  Smiley
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John9929
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« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2008, 02:49:01 pm »

Thanks guy's! This was only one image of several taken of the two bright passes, and is the more
interesting the third at 0213BST was quite dull compared though I did watch it Grin

That might be a good idea Martin with the 50mm 1.8 in another few days when the moon rises a bit later.
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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2008, 08:02:20 pm »

Quote
Fancy doing a deeper exposure of Aquila John for signs of 6P/d'Arrest?
Nearly had a go on 20/21st - did have a look & think but not quite sure I could just see something with 8" LX90 x77. The moonlight was a problem though.

The best results I've had for photographing brightish diffuse comets have been from using a 300mm f/4 lens either piggybacked on the scope or on an Astrotrac - stacking about a dozen 30 sec exposures using DSS is very effective in increasing the signal-to-noise ratio, and using a DSLR means that the comet shows up as a distinctive greenish blob, quite different from any nebulae which happen to be in the shot. A light pollution filter helps knock down interference from street lights etc. but does not suppress moonlight.
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John9929
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2008, 04:03:59 pm »

Sound advice Brian, but unfortunately I don't have all that equipment, nor could I afford it, so a few shots with the 1.8 will keep me happy.
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