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2009 Noctilucent Cloud Season

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Author Topic: 2009 Noctilucent Cloud Season  (Read 15730 times)
rjgjr
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« Reply #240 on: June 26, 2009, 08:42:36 pm »

That last one is incredible John, it looks like a sand dune or a snowdrift!. Very interesting.
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brianb
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« Reply #241 on: June 26, 2009, 09:55:56 pm »

Very interesting, we're obviously seeing the same formation even though we're tens of kilometers apart. Do you have an exact time for the last shot? My closeup (above) was 0252 BST. Looks like you've got beta Aur (with pi above it) in more or less the same position wrt the cloud as I've got Capella - if the times are similar we could triangulate....

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martinastro
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« Reply #242 on: June 26, 2009, 10:50:19 pm »

Very nice images John, I too like that last image - great structure!
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« Reply #243 on: June 26, 2009, 11:21:19 pm »

Thanks Richard.

Brian - I had noticed that earlier when I saw your image, it is the same formation with beta Aur and Pi, though I will have to leave the maths to you I'm afraid Grin My image was taken at 02:56 BST and is one of two taken within the minute. Would be interesting to hear the result of triangulation if you manage it. BTW I'm in Maghaberry which is probably about 30 miles from you.
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« Reply #244 on: June 27, 2009, 08:03:02 am »

Very interesting, we're obviously seeing the same formation even though we're tens of kilometers apart.
BTW, I have recently observed the same NLC formation together with observer from Kyiv (350km apart), I can suppose even 400-500km is possible.
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martinastro
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« Reply #245 on: July 01, 2009, 06:02:24 pm »

Some of those images from SW.com showing volcanic sunsets from the US look very similar to NLC. Has anyone seen them yet?. Can't get a clear night here to see these sunsets or NLCs.
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« Reply #246 on: July 01, 2009, 08:09:45 pm »

Some of those images from SW.com showing volcanic sunsets from the US look very similar to NLC. Has anyone seen them yet?. Can't get a clear night here to see these sunsets or NLCs.

Not seen them personally Martin but I know others have seen some 'different' sunset effects of late whilst getting ready to look for NLC.  Looking outside now I actually have blue skies (now the sun is below the rooftops!) - will be sure to take a look in an hour or so's time tho Smiley
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« Reply #247 on: July 01, 2009, 08:13:00 pm »

Yes I had Martin, in fact I mentioned this to you a few night's back, maybe you had forgotton? I can't make my mind up on them, but I have seen volcanic sunsets before and I never remember seeing ripples like that. Maybe all volcanic sunsets are different, I don't know. Here's an image from 18th Feb 2008 which shows the last big one from here.
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« Reply #248 on: July 01, 2009, 08:14:50 pm »

Great image John, that looks pretty volcanic to me! The 'ripples' seem to have been reported widely...
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« Reply #249 on: July 01, 2009, 08:21:32 pm »

The 'ripples' seem to have been reported widely...
Thanks Mark, maybe there's a bigger concentration of volcanic ash in the atmos this time?
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« Reply #250 on: July 01, 2009, 10:04:12 pm »

Hi John, I recall vivdly you saying that, and hadn't forgotten, however the image on SW today was the one which really got my attention, it was the one showing ripples with the Moon in the same frame taken after sunset. The similarity to NLCs is very striking!, in fact they look exactly like IIb bands. There must be impressive amounts of dust in the atmosphere from that volcano, I've never seen such highly structured volcanic sunset images before.  Smiley
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« Reply #251 on: July 01, 2009, 10:39:25 pm »

Had a look this evening, but, tbh, there wasn't much in the way of volcanic sunsets visible from the west midlands.  Ever so slight hint of purply pink, but it really was ever so slight.  Certainly here a casual observer wouldn't have noticed it...
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rjgjr
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« Reply #252 on: July 02, 2009, 07:36:46 am »

Sorry for getting off the subject of NLC's, but reading these posts tonight I had forgot I had taken these shots on the evening of June 26. These might fall into the catagory of volcanic sunsets, they coinside with the time period and images on spaceweather.com when the ash mass was passing over the U.S. Pacific Northwest.



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« Reply #253 on: July 02, 2009, 08:50:01 am »

Unexpected  & unforecast partially clear night last night, transparency was very poor though. NLC negative. The evening twilight did look redder than usual, possibly due to the Russian volcanic event. Morning twilight not observed as cloud cover increased to total around 0200 BST.
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markt
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« Reply #254 on: July 02, 2009, 10:11:10 am »

NLC were observed from about 02.00ut this morning in a couple of places...
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