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Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin)

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Author Topic: Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin)  (Read 15512 times)
Tyler
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« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2009, 11:26:59 pm »

I have been studying the APOD picture as well as finder charts, and am ready to wake up early and spot Lulin! maybe image as well. From the APOD picture it looks like the mag is really conservative, looks to me like its at least a mag 6.5 maybe even 6 (though im not an expert [duh]) Maybe imaging is not realiable for calculating Magnitudes? anyway, im going right now to check out Jupiter and Mercury.
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Roman White
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« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2009, 10:08:58 am »

From the APOD picture it looks like the mag is really conservative, looks to me like its at least a mag 6.5 maybe even 6 (though im not an expert [duh]) Maybe imaging is not realiable for calculating Magnitudes?
It is approx. +7.0mag which is quite nice.
The last report is from J.J.Gonzalez on Jan.05
Quote
C/2007 N3 (Lulin):
2009 Jan. 4.25 UT: m1=7.1, Dia.=5', DC=6, 10x50B
( Pandorado, alt. 1190 m, Leon, N. Spain )

Anybody in Europe had seen the comet last night?
I missed the last night but the next night (Jam.6/7) still remains to be my main target. Thanks for the heads up, Martin  Smiley I haven't seen any comets since C/2007W1 in August, so I'll try my best at N3 LuLin.
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Tyler
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« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2009, 01:08:37 pm »

I tried this morning, Figured I could stay inside and easily spot it with the Bino's. Totally forgot about atmospheric Extinction. lol So I had to get the scope out. I still didnt spot it though (Twilight Had begun before I went out there), I think Ill have to wait at least 2 more weeks till it is easily visible.

Oh well, Better Luck to you all. and Clear Skies!
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Roman White
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« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2009, 01:26:07 pm »

I think Ill have to wait at least 2 more weeks till it is easily visible.
I don't think it is too hard to find now. You must try it on every clear morning imho.  Smiley
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« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2009, 06:09:48 pm »

This info was posted by John F from the UKWW...

Comet Lulin is also one to watch for another reason.

It will be moving fast, quickly across the sky in february. Its movement will be fast enough to be viewable in seconds for the experienced observers with telescopes and in minutes for those with binoculars. See here for a little more detail from Sky & Telescope.

Quote:

Lulin’s closest approach to Earth, 0.41 a.u. (61 million km), occurs on February 24th, when the comet may reach a peak of magnitude 5. By now it's visible in late evening (after rising around the end of astronomical twilight) and remains in view for the rest of the night.

And it's speeding along at just over 5° per day! That's about 1 arcsecond every 5 seconds of time, enough to show obvious motion during a short telescopic observing session. Similarly, that's 1 arcminute per 5 minutes of time if you're using binoculars.

This is fast! 
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« Reply #35 on: January 06, 2009, 07:35:17 pm »

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That's about 1 arcsecond every 5 seconds of time, enough to show obvious motion during a short telescopic observing session.
Which makes it a b*gg*r to stack images .... Let's hope it's big enough to make a moderate focal length adequate, and bright enough not to need too deep an exposure!
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Martin Mc Kenna
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« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2009, 08:35:40 pm »

Brian, any idea what that speed is on MPH or KM/sec?. Someone asked this question on another forum and would love to know the answer.

Tyler, you could be rite, I suspect the mag estimates for this comet will jump as soon as it climbs into a higher region of sky. It certainly looks obious enough on the APOD page.

It was clear all night last night, I got up before dawn and it was cloudy everywhere..unbelievable. Attempt number 2 tonight.

Here's the sky & telescope article about the comet....

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/home/35992534.html

I think the hits on this thread are going to sky rocket in the weeks ahead. It will probably be our biggest yet!
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« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2009, 09:47:11 pm »

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any idea what that speed is on MPH or KM/sec?.
Easy enough to work out - one arc sec is 1/206265 of a radian (the angle whose arc is equal to its radius) so 1 arc sec / 5 secs is one millionth of the distance per second (plus 3 and a bit percent) ... the distance at closest approach being 0.41 AU = 61.5 million km, the speed must be 61.5 km/sec (plus 3 and a bit percent) i.e. 63 km/sec to 2 decimal places. Or 140,000 mph. Sounds about right since the comet's orbit is retrograde.
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Martin Mc Kenna
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« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2009, 09:51:33 pm »

Thanks very much for that Brian, that's excellent information!
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Roman White
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« Reply #39 on: January 06, 2009, 10:17:18 pm »

I think the hits on this thread are going to sky rocket in the weeks ahead. It will probably be our biggest yet!
I think so too. This topic will me more popular than 2 December conjunctions. 
I hope we'll see here many reports and images in the month ahead. Smiley

From Sky&Telescope article
Quote
The comet is on a nearly parabolic orbit, suggesting that it has never been greatly perturbed by the planets at all. Yet its orbital inclination is 178.4°, meaning that it's orbiting in the opposite direction from the planets just 1.6— from the ecliptic plane.
If it crosses ecliptic and passes close to Earth, can it cause a meteor shower?

P.S. The weather gives me a chance for the next morning, but it will be a hard one: -23C is already outside Shocked
« Last Edit: January 06, 2009, 10:27:30 pm by Roman White » Report Spam   Logged

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Tyler
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« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2009, 04:31:47 am »

 Martin, I think this thread will be very popular as well, with observing reports and images, I just hope that those of us with no deep sky imaging equiptment can still get some good shots. I might have to build a barndoor tracker  Grin
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martinastro
Martin Mc Kenna
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« Reply #41 on: January 08, 2009, 04:42:16 pm »

I know how you feel Tyler. I feel restricted by just having a camera on a static tripod. However, maybe we can make for the bigger gear by being more creative with our images  Smiley.  My plan of attack on Lulin will be basic but effective...visual observing, sketching and camera shots!

Whatever you use...enjoy the comet!
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Roman White
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« Reply #42 on: January 08, 2009, 06:18:15 pm »

My plan of attack on Lulin will be basic but effective...visual observing, sketching and camera shots!
Great plan! My is the same.  Smiley
Oh, if only it would be clear when the comet will pass 2o near Saturn, fingers crossed  Roll Eyes

P.S. No more clear skies here. It started snowing previous late night, and it is constantly snowing... even now! 
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Martin Mc Kenna
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« Reply #43 on: January 09, 2009, 04:53:45 pm »

I had my first attempt at trying to catch Lulin before dawn this morning between 05.00 and 05.30. Due to the comet's low elevation I had to go for a walk to a higher vantage point up a hill near my home. I had to carry my tripod and 90mm ETX with me. The sky was clear but in poor shape with a near full Moon low in the W and light fog in the E all happening under a severe frost. The whole place was white and rock hard. I was quite taken aback by the low temp which made messing about with clamps and metal dust caps a real pain. I did a few sweeps for Lulin but I knew it was in vain due to the murk. The ETX shook and wobbled on the flimsy tripod causing the stars to dance all over the place. The stars didn't want to stay in focus either. Feeling raged and frustrated I packed up half an hour later. Here's an image looking towards the comet at 05.30. You can see Libra and Ophiuchus. Hopefully the sky will be better on my next effort. The Moon is up all night now.

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Tyler
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« Reply #44 on: January 09, 2009, 05:14:44 pm »

Glad you at least had a partial clearing Martin, even though you didnt see it yet either. I might have to try tonight, maybe ill do an all night observing session! lol. A guy from Kansas imaged it yesterday... here (right now this is probably the best we could do, But I dont even have a prime lens [i did just get a new laptop though  Smiley So in the next month I should get my website going]) ANYWAYS here is the link...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kansashorizons/3179503081/sizes/o/

EDIT: no observing tonight for me, 1/2" of snow instead (all we get anymore is 1" snowstorms)
« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 05:16:53 pm by Tyler » Report Spam   Logged



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