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Harvest Moonbow

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Author Topic: Harvest Moonbow  (Read 364 times)
martinastro
Martin Mc Kenna
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« on: October 04, 2009, 03:31:42 am »

Caught this partial Moonbow (Lunar Rainbow) on Oct 3rd at 20.30 BST in the western sky opposite the Harvest Moon when a weak shower passed over the Sperrin Mountains at the correct moment. It was only visible for 2 min's but it was a nice sight all the same and easily visible with the naked eye with obvious colour. 28mm lens at F/2.8, 30 sec exp ISO200.

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rjgjr
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« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2009, 07:25:55 am »

An excellent catch to start off the season Martin!
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jgs001
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« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2009, 08:47:17 am »

very nice capture Martin
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« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2009, 08:51:51 am »

Great capture Martin!  We went out for a curry for a friends birthday last night, and afterwards when we'd retired to the pub for some liquid refreshment all ended up standing outside with our bevvies as it was hot and heaving indoors.  High cloud meant there was a really obvious 22deg halo around the moon which got everyones attention and became the topic of much debate.  This then led onto me doing a brief planetarium - pointing out jupiter and the few bright stars that are visible from a brightly lit, inner city pub beer garden.  All good fun  Roll Eyes
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Roman White
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« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2009, 10:09:43 am »

Very nice landscape Martin! You know what to do when the Moon is full. (instead, i.e. people like me say that there's nothing to observe and go to bed.)  Grin
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martinastro
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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2009, 03:01:04 pm »

Thanks everyone for the comments, I will be looking out for more of these in the future, hopefully more brighter and dramatic examples to come. This was the first I've seen in a long time. I reckon a 50mm F/1.8 lens would do wonders on these with the brightest section of the bow/foreground interface in the frame.

Mark, great to hear you are educating everyone about the night sky - a fantastic thing to do.  Smiley

Roman, lol, there's not much else to be done when there's a bright Moon up, so I always look for transient atmospheric phenomena associated with the Moon itself. Slow shutter work and night with the glow of a bright Moon can be very rewarding at times.
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brianb
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2009, 03:05:59 pm »

Quote
there's not much else to be done when there's a bright Moon up
I disagree strongly with this statement. Dwarf novae don't give up varying just because the Moon is about. OK, so you can't see faint objects so well, but that's no excuse for not looking at objects which can vary in a timescale of hours.
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martinastro
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2009, 03:33:10 pm »

I fully agree with you Brian. I was thinking more of deep sky observing than anything else. I often observe faint comets under a full Moon myself just for the fun of it and check variable stars. Also, an observer should be watching meteor showers and for auroras even when the Moon is full too. I'm a big supporter of this attitude myself.  It's really only the DSO people who are effected, along with the fainter comets.
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John9929
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2009, 06:11:25 pm »

And it didn't stop me trying to image the proposed crash site for the LCROSS space probe on the 9th October Grin. The area of impact is said to be the Cabeus area, but NASA keep shifting the goalposts on this. If Cabeus is selected it is just beyond the prominent mountain with the bright top 1.5" from center bottom of the frame. Drygalski is the crater with the central peak. This image was taken around 3am this morning (Oct 4th) when the moon became reachable from my driveway. The scope also had to be sheltered from the constant breeze. Earlier I also had a look at Uranus and Neptune.
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martinastro
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« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2009, 08:07:08 pm »

That's a stunner John!!, congrats on a good catch. I knew you would be preparing for this impact. Keeping an eye on things myself to see if they are going to decide on a crater.
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John9929
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« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2009, 09:54:28 pm »

Thanks Martin, it will be very interesting to see which crater will be selected, unfortunately the timing of the impact does not favor Europe on this occasion, unless of course they change it!

Nice moonbow BTW, I was watching for some myself but didn't see any.
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John9929.
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« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2009, 02:27:18 am »

That's a stunner Martin. Talk about being in the right place at the right time! I really like the rich green in particular.

Nice lunar shot John. I think the lunar crash is timed for about 12.30pm BST on the 9th - pity it wasn't at nightime over here!
« Last Edit: October 05, 2009, 10:05:59 pm by Big Dipper » Report Spam   Logged

Remember:- If all else fails, read the Instruction Manual! Grin
 


Andy
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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2009, 11:26:37 am »

It's really only the DSO people who are effected, along with the fainter comets.

Yes that's obviously true for observing Martin. However for imaging the Moon needn't necessarily be a much of a handicap if you are doing narrowband imaging with a Halpha filter. In fact the Moon can be useful for stop me tripping over my jet black cat!  Wink
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Andy
martinastro
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« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2009, 02:46:39 pm »

LOl Andy, that's brilliant about the Cat  Smiley, good to see such a positive responses to moonlit nights on here. It has always amazed me over the years how the people I've met, and corresponded with, will avoid looking at anything when there's a bright Moon up. They don't seem to know that some of the most spectacular phenomena can coincide with the Moon.

Thanks regarding the Moonbow.
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JohnC
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« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2009, 03:49:06 pm »

A very attractive photo ,mMrtin. I've never seen a moonbow ,I need to loo kout for one when conditions are right ,I assume the same 42 degrees is involved ?
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