Astronomy, Photography and Weather
August 15, 2020, 05:46:58 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: IAA lecture programme continues alternate Wednesdays from September - an excellent programme of lectures- Queens University Belfast - Bell Lecture Theatre. Also keep an eye out for the Summer Events
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

A New Comet In Cassiopeia!

Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: A New Comet In Cassiopeia!  (Read 1098 times)
martinastro
Martin Mc Kenna
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5182


Maghera, N. Ireland


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2009, 06:32:19 pm »

I can't see the image Roman, any chance of a re-post?  Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

Roman White
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1479


Poltava, Ukraine


View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2009, 06:43:34 pm »

Michael Jäger's image from April 7th
(re-uploaded via Tinypic)



and a trajectory for a longer period (April-May 2009):


P.S. Note that it passes now across the same area where 8P/Tuttle was in Dec.2007. But the last one was quickly heading southwards, and the new one will stay circumpolar until late May - early June, while slowly moving to SE - towards the Sun (minimal elongation 1.5deg. in July)
« Last Edit: April 08, 2009, 06:54:54 pm by Roman White » Report Spam   Logged

SkyWatcher 130/900mm EQ3, Bresser 76/700mm, 20x90 bino. and other, Olympus SP-550UZ
Eclipse & comet chaser, occultation & meteor observer
Poltava Astronomy Portal
martinastro
Martin Mc Kenna
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5182


Maghera, N. Ireland


View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: April 08, 2009, 07:12:53 pm »

Thanks Roman. That's a beauty!.  Yi-SWAN also passes below the double cluster making for a nice wide field photo opp  Smiley

Here's an article from Sky & Telescope magazine...

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/resources/proamcollab/astroalert/42672257.html
« Last Edit: April 08, 2009, 07:15:14 pm by martinastro » Report Spam   Logged

Roman White
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1479


Poltava, Ukraine


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2009, 08:02:37 pm »

Thanks for the useful link, Martin
Quote
On Saturday evening, April 11th, the comet passes just 0.4° south of Schedar (α Cassiopeiae), so they'll be in the same low-power telescopic field.
Smiley

by the way,
Quote
The proper pronunciation of the name " 이 " in South Korea is "E" as in the letter in English -  [i:]
(...) Although in North Korea the name is is still spelt as "리" pronunced as Lee
(...) The name is sometimes also transliterated as Yi (...)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_%28Korean_name%29
(I had some problems transliterating it in Russian, English transliteration isn't much clear too)
Report Spam   Logged

SkyWatcher 130/900mm EQ3, Bresser 76/700mm, 20x90 bino. and other, Olympus SP-550UZ
Eclipse & comet chaser, occultation & meteor observer
Poltava Astronomy Portal
jgs001
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1280


Horsham, Sussex, UK


View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2009, 09:03:11 pm »

Thanks for the info, and good luck everyone. I can't see Cassie this time of year... She's hiding in the trees...
Report Spam   Logged

John
Canon 450d, EF-S 18-55 IS, 55-250 IS, Raynox DCR250
HQE5 + C80ED & Vista 80s. NexStar Skymax 102 SLT.

*** My Astro Blog ***
jjb
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 253



View Profile
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2009, 02:26:46 pm »

Observed comet last night in the big binos it was a wispy patch with a greenish tinge to it below the bottom star in the w of cassie it was good to finally track this one down.


jonathan.
Report Spam   Logged
martinastro
Martin Mc Kenna
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5182


Maghera, N. Ireland


View Profile WWW
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2009, 09:11:28 pm »

Congratulations Jonathan!. I have been hampered by street lights these last two nights. Maybe round 3 this evening. Good luck with your future observations.  Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

Roman White
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1479


Poltava, Ukraine


View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2009, 01:25:14 pm »

Now I understood that circumpolar not always mean easy.  Grin I made my first attempt to find it on Apr.11 evening (21:30 EEST) with 20cm refractor at Poltava gravimetric observatory.

The comet was only 20' S from alpha Cassiopejae, also (as C/2008 T2) in a Milky Way area rich with stars.

The altitude was only 18oN and some haze was quite noticeable (NELM<4.0). The stellar ML (telescope) was 12.0m. Possibly there was something very dim and hazy (noticed by me & other observer) but it was as good as a result of imagination  Wink
IMHO the comet was not brighter than 9.0m.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2009, 11:51:09 am by Roman White » Report Spam   Logged

SkyWatcher 130/900mm EQ3, Bresser 76/700mm, 20x90 bino. and other, Olympus SP-550UZ
Eclipse & comet chaser, occultation & meteor observer
Poltava Astronomy Portal


Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy